All posts filed under: Pandemic Parenting

Keeping On

My son Kyle turned seventeen the same month when the shutdown started. My husband and I planned to take Kyle and a few of his friends to RPM Raceway. It had been our long standing tradition—birthday excursions like paintball, bowling, escape rooms, and DJ lessons to name a few. Because of COVID, we cancelled our plans. Instead, we had a quiet dinner at home. Just Kyle, his boyfriend, my husband and me. I thought that in a few weeks, we would be able to celebrate the way we had in years past. That things would get back to normal.   Except, they didn’t.   Before COVID, Kyle would wake up and pick out his favorite hoodie, sweatpants and throw on his 80’s styled rim prescription glasses. A few times a week I would prepare him smoothies to get him to stay for breakfast. Some days it worked, other days I had to chase him out the front door, urging him to at least take his coat. Kyle would fly down the stairs, his tall lanky frame skipping …

Where do Mother’s Go

Where do Mother’s go to fall apart, Safely You can scream with Intent to pierce the sky Glass shards fall on skin Air pockets to breathe from Where do mothers fall apart, Safely Their children won’t be taken From them Instead, someone hugs them While mother licks her wounds Where do mother’s fall apart, Safely They cry themselves dry They sit in the abyss They understand Why one would abandon their seed Thanks for reading! If you enjoy Raising Mothers, please consider making a one-time or recurring contribution to help us remain ad-free. If even a fraction of subscribers signed up to contribute $1 per month, Raising Mothers could be self-sustaining!

Eating in Pandemic Times

“Can you look at this?” My mother asked as we sat and waited in the car for our turn at the food pantry, masks on. She shoved a piece of paper in my hand. It was a letter from a life insurance company. My mom recently turned 73, which makes us 38 years apart. When my father died in 2003, she relented and purchased her own policy. Month after month, she religiously pays $120 for a $100,000 payout when she dies. “It’s just a letter stating that they updated your address,” I said in Vietnamese. “I told them a few years ago to add your brother Long to the policy, but somehow they never did!” she exclaimed and sighed. For all the things my mother and I talk about, life insurance is typically not one of them. I asked her what she wanted done for her funeral. “Oh, don’t worry about it. I already purchased a plot!” This was news to me. I had no idea that she’d already prepared for her death. It was …

School-to-Prison Pipeline: Disabled Black Indigenous Boys in the Time of Covid-19

RESOURCE: Are Native Children Being Pushed Into Prison? An infographic produced by the National Congress of American Indians http://www.ncai.org/policy-research-center/research-data/prc-publications/School-to-Prison_Pipeline_Infographic.pdf All poetry & collage by Se’mana Thompson Thanks for reading! If you enjoy Raising Mothers, please consider making a one-time or recurring contribution to help us remain ad-free. If even a fraction of subscribers signed up to contribute $1 per month, Raising Mothers could be self-sustaining!