Author: Sherisa de Groot

How Systemic Racism Dismantled My Mommy Group | Dawn White

Content Warning: Sexual Assault It all began when we were asked to help pay for a mommy’s housekeeper and nanny. And it climaxed when Kobe Bryant died.  For those unfamiliar with Facebook Mommy Groups, first let me set up some framework for you. There exists a world of private regional online support in the shape of Facebook groups for mommies. These groups were started by a mom and grew through invitations to other women within their network. The groups all claim to offer support in a safe space where women can commiserate about motherhood, seek advice and referrals, and discuss lifestyle questions. Topics range from sleep training to real estate and pop culture events. Whether the group has 200 or 1,000 members, the rules are almost always the same:  Rule #1. What you post is sacred, meaning what goes on in Mommy Group stays in Mommy Group. Just by writing this, I’m breaking Rule #1. Rule #2 The tone of the group must remain respectful and judgment free. While I’m at it, lemme just go …

to the ghosts at sea, give her back | Noemi Ixchel Martinez

From the collection “to the ghosts at sea, giver her back” I’ve been trying to write myself out/ write myself out of my exploding chest/of that hospital room/I’ve been trying to write myself out of that/chest where I’m shakingshaking/wakeupwakeupwakethe fuckup/I’m falling deep/ that cave/ that chest /that hole/ breathingnotbreathing/ the machines tick tock tick tick tick tock/ goes by /I’m still there To the ghosts at sea/ give her back/ to the witches that are guiding her/ bring her back / she’s still mine / to the oceans that took her / home is here To the doctor who asked if we had guns in the house we are the other/ in america/ in the other america / watching sidelines/ brown faces/ glossies cover us in gauze and quote/ snap we are in the news coverage / go on, show me figurines of spacecrafts on a screen/ planets blooming stars of her brain / no, no guns, no, no silent alarms / no You might ask urself why I wrote u into this poem Why …

On Ascension | Gris Muñoz

The first garden I ever really tended to, I planted with an ex-partner. We’d spent several weekend morningstilling and nurturing a small plot in my backyard, transforming the soil from arid and unkempt to rich and fecund. Upon harvesting, we filled a large basket with robust vegetables: chards, bright magenta-colored beets, green-leaf lettuce, cherry tomatoes, Anaheim peppers. I was most excited with the constant supply of tomatoes, amazed we’d started the produce from seeds and yielded such healthy plants. Months later it became obvious that the garden was flourishing but the relationship was ending. I realized that after years of single motherhood, I’d allowed myself to attach to an emotionally abusive person out of loneliness. When the relationship ended, I was bedridden for three months, falling deep into a clinical depression. Whenever I’d get up, my head felt dizzy, my thinking dulledand lagging. I was unable to keep up with my full-time job and just let it fade away, hoping my savings was enough until I was well again. In the mornings, I would struggle to …

Raising Mothers turns 5 this August!

This August Raising Mothers hits a milestone age. We are turning 5! In preparation of celebrating all month long; I am reaching out to you as our community. Raising Mothers wouldn’t exist without community, and as the creator of this sacred space, it is important that I drive that point home. I am currently working on our programming for the month and want to give you a heads up on what you can expect. Workshops! Our very first workshop will be with Julia Mallory of Black Mermaids. We plan on having at least one workshop a month (so if you are a writer and would like to sign up to lead one, contact us). Registration is currently open. A survey! I’m currently drafting a survey and I want to hear from you once it’s out. I’ll be calling on you to share it far and wide. Our annual pledge drive! Since 2016 I’ve held a pledge drive on behalf of Raising Mothers. This year I would like to see our membership soar and we need …

When Race, Culture, and Dinner Collide | Marion Ruybalid

“Mom, can we please go to the Indian restaurant for my birthday dinner?” my daughter Ellianna begged. Turning twelve had awakened a desire to experience her Bangladeshi side. “We’ll see,” I said. My husband Tim smiled at me. I tried to smile back, but I felt sweat pooling in the palms of my hands. I had dreaded this moment because going there would reveal that, as a Bangladeshi adopted woman raised by white British parents in the United States, I knew very little about my own culture.  My parents told me stories about their life in Dhaka. My dad worked for Save the Children helping starving mothers and their children. My mom enjoyed white female privileges. At dinner parties, the men and the women would culturally be separate, but my mom ate with the men. Their lifestyle was more comfortable than the one they would have had in England. They had a Hindu cook and Muslim gardener. If my parents requested chicken for dinner, they would work together  to protect the Hindu cook’s religious practices. …